Sermon: Outside the Party?

A very important note about sources: Several structures, themes, and ideas of this message, especially some text enclosed in quotation marks, has been lifted from the course, available on the udemy platform, entitled, “Paul and His Letter to the Ephesians,” the copyright for which belongs to N.T. Wright Online, 2016. Also see the relevant sections of Wright, N. T. Paul for Everyone: The Prison Letters: Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and Philemon. London Louisville, KY: SPCK Westminster John Knox Press, 2004. Please see also Wright, N. T., and Lin Johnson. Ephesians: 11 Studies for Individuals and Groups. Downers Grove, IL: IVP Connect,…

What’s going on?

I have always said that Los Angeles wasn’t the city for me—that doing life in L.A. would be a catastrophic mistake. I was going to get my Ph.D. in French history and run off to a cushy European tenure-track professorship. To live the remainder of my life in L.A. would mean (in the words of Racine’s Le songe d’Athalie), C’était pendant l’horreur d’une profonde nuit.

The Eschatology of Turkish Delight

 C.S. Lewis narrates the psychology of self-deception in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. He presents an ambiguous anthropology that is distinctly non-Augustinian, where deviance and wickedness are divorced from inherent evil: “You mustn’t think that even now Edmund was quite so bad that he actually wanted his brother and sisters to be turned into stone. He did want Turkish Delight and to be a Prince (and later a King) and to pay Peter out for calling him a beast. As for what the Witch would do with the others, he didn’t want her to be particularly nice to them…